Friday, February 17, 2006

Let me kick a little something for the Wahoos.

In 2002, I submitted to the Declaration an article that described the events that occurred at Gildersleeve Portal on October 4, 1992. At the time, however, the submission was declined, owing in part to the fact that the editor at the time was not anywhere near as cool as Amy Argetsinger.

Nevertheless, my Ken Burnsian recollection of the events of that fabled day have found an even better home, where it shall long live and be remembered: The Brown College Wiki.

So, take a trip back to the time prior to the Browning of Monroe Hill, before the coming of the Groh--to an age where the UVA bookstore didn't even have its own Clinique counter!--and enjoy the exciting tale of The Gildersleeve Uprising.

And, if you're wondering if the whole thing happened because of something I did...well...

14 comments:

Sharon Rose said...

Please tell me the bookstore doesn't REALLY have a Clinique counter?

CLAS '93 - Wahoowa!

The Deceiver said...

The last time I was there, it did. Along with a dizzying array of Demeter custom scents. My wife, who went to Shenandoah Conservatory of Music, humbly nestled in the hills of Winchester, was quite gobsmacked.

DC1974 said...

oh not only does it have a Clinique counter. but you can put the whole shopping trip -- Das Kapital and a concealer -- on your UVa ID card and bill it all to your parents.

DC1974 said...

CLAS '96 here, but somewhere in fog of First Year, I don't remember the Gildersleeve uprising. Although, I tried to ignore Mo' Hill, especially after they didn't accept me. (Perhaps it was that snarky -- before snark was cool -- admissions "essay" I did to the tune of the theme song to the Jefferson's. humorless f*cks.)

Sharon Rose said...

I suddenly feel very, very old.

PK said...

In case you're wondering... www.ianfisk.com.

I've run into him several times through Net Impact stuff, and never knew he was a Hoo, much less the King George of the early-90s Monroe Hill.

Amy Argetsinger said...

Wow... This is weird. For a few minutes there I thought I was going to have to call you out on your historical accuracy -- which would have made me feel like a jerk, what with that lovely and utterly unnecessary shout-out -- because I KNEW for a fact that legendary Monroe Hill denizen Ian Fisk graduated in '90, with my own class of PSTers. But I decided to check myself first (thinking, "hey, maybe Ian never finished that thesis on time after all...") and went to hoosonline.com. Well, come to find out that '93 had its OWN Ian Fisk! Astounding but true...

In fact, PK, the Ian Fisk you've run into is the '90 model.

Also, though you are very kind, Jason, I feel compelled to tell you that my Monroe Hill application was twice rejected for uncoolness.

I think the Clinique counter appeared around the time of my five-year reunion in '95. My friends and I still use it as evidence of some kind of "kids these days!!!" theory.

The Deceiver said...

Amy--

I actually went through the exact same thing--the whole Ian Fisk is still around? phenommenon--because as a first year coming in the year you left, it look me like three days to identify Ian Fisk as one of those names that you dropped if you wanted to feel like you were inside.

Frankly, I think Ian Fisk ver. 2.0 rode his predecessor's good name to glory.

I think my Monroe Hill application was set on fire upon receipt. Clearly I should have cozied up to as many Ian Fisks as I could get my hands on! As it was, I knew just enough people from Gildersleeve to have been party to this.

When I think about the epic lines as everyone bought their books at Newcomb, snaking their way to the two cashiers, I can only feel like today's Wahoos are missing out.

Sharon Rose said...

A friend of mine submitted his Hill application in crayon - or was it his Lawnie app? He never received a response, obviously.

I, too, have memories of those two crowded little rooms in the basement of the Newcomb cafeteria which was a great source of powdered eggs and various indistinguishable gravies. Sing with me, Sting: "Every little thing they serve is tragic..."

Thanks for explaining why the name Ian Fisk rang a bell but his wedding pics didn't.

PK said...

Is Ian Fisk an anagram for something maybe? Or are we being colonized by an intensely unoriginal alien race that can only think of one name?

That is just too weird.

Ian said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Ian said...

Ian T. Fisk here, UVA CLAS '90, Resident of Rogers in Monroe Hill for three years. And Associate Literary editor for the Declaration in the late 80s, who had the great pleasure and joy to work with the wonderful Ms. Amy Argetsinger. Like Ian M. Fisk (CLAS '93, currently a physics professor at Fermilab I think) I also lived in Rogers 144 at one point. (A joke of Carl Trindle's I think.) However, I prefer to think of my legacy to TJ's vacation home as co-founding the Yellow Journal. And my legacy to Monroe Hill as the chronicler of Chris Fall and the great "Door Propping" war of 1987 (or so.) Or perhaps the addition of literary graffiti to the steam tunnels. Anyway, Deceiver, your article was very amusing. And my lawn application started with "I always thought lawnies were stuck-up snobs." It was not accepted.

The Deceiver said...

Welcome Ian!! It's a pleasure to make your acquaintance. Ms. Argetsinger's quite the good egg, isn't she? Let me bestow many wreaths of respect upon you for bringing the Yellow Journal into world. Teeming minds, bad attitudes and gutpunch laffs were its stock in trade, and I always looked forward to it as a needed dose of hoo-hah dissecting reality. Its pages, I recall, attracted the unholy wit of Tyler Magill--one of my contempos who I always admired for making UVA his own demented playground. Without over sentimentalizing, I think you rocked our little patch of firmament as much as anyone who was allowed the priviledge of an outbuilding pissoir.

The Deceiver said...

Sharon, as I recall, the meal served after any football game was so depressing that it was like Midnight in the Garden of Evil and Evil. And it was always "fast food", and by fast, I'm referring to how swiftly it circumnavigated one's alimentary canal.